Liverpool docks

We visited some of the south docks. Most of them are part of residential places or business parks.

Albert Dock is the most famous. Jesse Hartley designs the dock in 1839, but the construction began in 1841 and in 1845 the dock opens. Albert dock functioned until 1972. Now it hosts a few museums, restaurants and bars and it’s the starting point for sightseeing tours.ld_01

Wapping dock opens in 1834. It has been developed to link Georges, Salthouse, Canning, Albert, Dukes, Kings, Queens and Brunswick docks. The Wapping dock warehouse closes in 1988.
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The duck marines on the dock.
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King’s dock is connected with Wapping dock and Queen’s dock in the south. The dock was designed by Henry Berry and opened in 1785.

Kings dock was rebuilt in 1898 under the Dock Improvement Act and began to import fresh fruit from the Canary Islands, which was stored in quayside sheds. Samples were taken to the Liverpool Fruit Exchange where they were auctioned.

In early 2000 was planned the development of the under-utilised land at Kings dock. Initial reviews considered a range of options for the site and a concert arena and convention center facility was identified as likely to make the biggest impact on employment, the local economy and Liverpool’s national profile. So it was built the Echo arena and the Wheel.
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The Liverpool Cathedral seen from the docks. We went with Festus there, a few months ago.
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Queen’s dock, opened in 1785 and it’s the largest.
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The waterfront continue with the Royal Navy Headquarters (RNHQ) Merseyside, the HMS Eaglet establishment of the Royal Naval Reserve. This and the other docks in the southern system are owned by British Waterways.

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