Erddig

Erddig is a beautiful early 18th-century country house, in Wales. As part of National Trust, it is very well preserved.ew_01

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It was very nice to see the life they had downstairs, the kitchen, laundry, stables. From time to time it’s possible to take a horse carriage ride. I would have loved to do that, but it wasn’t possible when we’ve visited it.
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A very old type of fridge.
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The gentry quarters looked beautiful. The music room was lovely, maybe my favourite.
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The servants rooms in the attic.
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The chapel room was bigger than expected.
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The garden is beautiful, a lot of apple trees and flowers. My favorite flower was the black one. It was the first time I ever saw such a flower, but it is gorgeous.
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In the pond there were a few very friendly fish.
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There was a tree carving demonstration. This amazing wolf was carved with the chainsaw!!
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This wolf was carved before we arrived at Erddig.
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I tried my acrobatic skills on the log :)
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Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

We’ve visited Pontcysyllte Aqueduct in Wrexham, Wales. The name means “the bridge that connects”. It is very impressive to see it. It has 18 piers and 19 arches and the River Dee runs beneath it.

It was designed by Thomas Telford and William Jessop was the canal engineer involved in this project. The building started in July 1795 and it was completed in 1805. The aqueduct holds 1.5 million litres of water and takes two hours to drain.

As I’ve read in the brochure from the visitors center, techniques and ideas developed at Pontcysyllte had great impact on engineering. pa_01

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