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Wedgwood Museum and Tea Rooms

I wanted to go to Wedgwood Museum and tea rooms for a while, and earlier this month I finally went there. We’ve planned to go to a restaurant that day, so we’ve only ordered cream tea at Wedgwood. See more on worldofwedgwood.

 Wedgwood Tea Rooms and Museum

The Tea Conservatory looks lovely decorated. As we went to Wedgwood during the weekend, it was busy. Also, we weren’t able to take on a factory tour as the employees aren’t working on the weekends. I’ve had such a lovely time, that I want to visit the Wedgwood museum again and see the factory too.

Cream tea at Wedgwood Tea Rooms and Museum

We’ve picked two different types of tea. I went for Oriental Jewel. It is a black tea with sandalwood, juniper berries, and pine. My husband tried Blue Pagoda, on Oolong tea with mango and jasmine. I think both teas were delicious. The scones were a bit biscuit-like, maybe they had too much butter for my taste. They were nice though, just not what I prefer.

Wedgwood Tea Rooms and Museum

Wedgwood Tea Rooms and Museum

After having tea and scones, we went to the Wedgwood Museum. I wanted to know more about the history of Wedgwood. It is a very old brand, started by Josiah Wedgwood in 18th century. Josiah’s father died and his business was inherited by his eldest son, Thomas. Josiah was an apprentice to his brother. He worked in the family pottery until 1752.

Wedgwood Museum

This gorgeous vase dates back to the 1790s. It is made from blue jasper. For me, Jasper is what I associate with Wedgwood, thus my Wedgwood vase is blue Jasper. I love it.

Wedgwood Museum

This stunning vase is made from earthenware and is from 1765, signed by George Stubbs.

Wedgwood Museum

Josiah Wedgwood picture is an enamel on a ceramic tablet, dated 1780.

Wedgwood Museum

All these vases are from 1770s. From the Queen’s ware collection, getting its name because it was delivered to the Queen. He was also allowed to call himself “Potter to Her Majesty”. It proved to be very popular.

Wedgwood Museum

Plaque is showing Josiah’s home, Etruria Hall, completed in 1769.

Wedgwood Museum

Josiah was keen on making all sorts of experiments. This wooden tray shows one of his trials. Each piece has a number marked on it, that correspondents to his experiment book. The pieces are from 1773-1776.

Wedgwood Museum

Wedgwood Museum

Wedgwood Museum

Wedgwood Museum

Josiah was concerned about slavery. He participated in the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade. Josiah was also a close friend with William Wilberforce and Thomas Clarkson, who were both heavily involved in the slavery movement. He made, at his own expense, slave cameos, like the ones in this picture. The cameos were used for advertising.

Wedgwood Museum

In this painting Josiah Wedgwood is depicted with his wife and their seven children.

Wedgwood Museum

I think these vases are lovely. I particularly like the pair of vases with swan handles. Is made from black basalt, from around 1785 – 1790.

Wedgwood Museum

Wedgwood Museum

The vases are from 1890; the difference between them and the vases from 100 years before. At Wedgwood Museum all these transformations are shown. The museum is large, much bigger than I was expected. I think at least 2 hours should be allocated to visiting the museum.

Wedgwood Museum

Wedgwood Museum and Tea Rooms are in World of Wedgwood, on Wedgwood Drive, Barlaston, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST12 9ER. There is a big car park. There is also a shop. It is a great day for a day out.

3 Comment

  1. The Blue Jasper (which I didn’t know was its actual name) is what always comes to mind when I think of Wedgwood, so I enjoyed seeing all these other patterns and varieties.

  2. I’ve never been to the Wedgewood museum but my great grandfather actually worked at the Wedgewood factory so my nan and my mum have quite a few pieces in their homes. The blue Jasper is my favourite style.

    When I went to Russia, all the palaces were full of Wedgewood pieces, and I couldn’t help but wonder if my great grandfather had handled any of them!

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