Category Archives: Travel

Wheatsheaf Inn Wirral

I’ve been to the Wheatsheaf Inn, an old pub in Wirral for many years, but I never blogged about it, not even a small mention. The pub was recommended to me by the guy who sold us the car and I know how strange that sounds. Locally is known as the Thatch due to its thatched roof. My husband and I were both very excited about the pub and when we mentioned it to our friends, they told us Wheatsheaf Inn is one of their favourite pubs too. In celebration of this, we went there for drinks, obviously.

Wheatsheaf Inn Wirral

The pub celebrated its 400th birthday in 2011. In the next building is the Cowshed restaurant. The restaurant gets its name from a long history of dairy farming and because it’s a converted old cattle barn, 250 years old.

Wheatsheaf Inn Wirral

This time we went during the day for coffee and a light lunch and I was very pleased with everything. We did have to wait a bit for our lunch, but I wasn’t too bothered about it. We had the time and I like the place so much that I was happy to wait.

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Witley Court and Gardens

It’s been a while since I visited a ruin, so Witley Court and Gardens was on my list of things to see. I love ruins, I find them romantic and a bit sad, but in a lovely way. Witley Court is now managed by English Heritage.

 Witley Court and Gardens

In the 1890s Witley Court was visited by the fashionable society. One of the frequent visitors was the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII.

 Witley Court and Gardens part of English Heritage

Witley Court started as a medieval manor house and it was transformed into a substantial Jacobean mansion by 1655 when it was bought by Thomas Foley. The family started their business by manufacturing nails. Gradually they abandoned the industrial base and went on concentrating on being landed aristocrats and politicians. The 1st Baron Foley (1673–1733) enlarged the house by adding wings on either sides.

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The Queen’s Head Frodsham

We were planning to go to another pub, close by, but we stopped for lunch at The Queen’s Head Frodsham. It was a lovely day, so we were lucky to have the whole room for us as almost everybody was in the garden. I was delighted to be able to take as many pictures as I wanted without being worried that I will bother others.

 The Queen's Head Frodsham

The Queen’s Head was built in the 17th century and it’s a Grade II listed pub. It started as a coaching inn in Frodsham and it would have house 23 horses. The stables can be seen at the rear of the pub, but we didn’t go outside, so I missed that. It’s a reason to have another lunch at them.
The pub was called The King’s Head, changing the name to The Queen’s Head when Queen Victoria came to the throne in 1837.

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Shakespeare’s New Place and Shakespeare’s Grave

After going to Shakespeare’s Birthplace, my husband and I went to see Shakespeare’s New Place and Shakespeare’s Grave. For the Birthplace, the New Place and Hall’s Croft a special ticket can be bought that will cover all three attractions, at the moment is just shy of £17 for adults.

Shakespeare's New Place and Shakespeare's Grave

Shakespeare’s New Place is the house he bought a few years after he got married, in 1597. He bought the house from William Underhill. Underhill was poisoned two months later by his son, who was hanged for the murder. All the property he owned were confiscated by the crown. It’s quite a strange story.

A couple of years after he bought the house, The Globe theatre is built in London. In 1601 his father died and he inherited the house he was born in. Only two years after that, Queen Elizabeth I dies and she is succeeded by King James VI and I. In 1607, Susanna Shakespeare, his eldest child, marries Dr. Hall. Their house is the third property I mentioned at the beginning.
An year later, in 1608, Shakespeare’s mother dies. In 1609 his Sonnets are published. William Shakespeare dies at New Place in 1616, aged 52.

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Shakespeare’s Birthplace

My husband and I went to Stratford upon Avon in our holiday. We’ve been there before, just to see the city, in an evening. So, this time, we went after lunch time, to make sure we have time to see Shakespeare’s Birthplace, Shakespeare’s New place, his grave and Hall’s Croft.

Shakespeare’s Birthplace is one of the 5 attractions in Stratford upon Avon that are part of Shakespeare’s past. For our visit, we’ve started with Shakespeare’s Birthplace. As it’s obvious from its name, this is the house where William Shakespeare was born. He grew up in this house with his parents and siblings. After he got married in 1582, the first 5 years he lived here with his wife Anne Hathaway. In 1583 William had his first child, Susanna and after 2 years they had twins.

 Shakespeare's Birthplace

His father worked in this house for 50 years. He married Mary Arden in 1557 and they had 8 children. William was the third, born in 1564. In 1568 John, William’s father, became the Mayor and William was in a privileged position, being able to go to the local grammar school for his education. The school was established by King Edward VI. His futher died in 1601 and William inherited the house as the eldest surviving child.

William leased part of the property and it became an inn called the Maidenhead, later being The Swan and Maidenhead. The inn was open until 1847. The house passed to Susanna, William’s daughter and after that to Elizabeth, his granddaughter. As Elizabeth had no children, after her death, the house was inherited by a descendant of one of William’s sisters. They had the house until 1847, when the house went up for sale and was bought by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. I think it’s amazing that the house was in Shakespeare’s family until bought by the trust.

 Shakespeare's Birthplace

Before seeing the house, we passed by a museum with artifacts, a history of the house and clips. One of the artifacts on display is this First Folio. Its full title is Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories & Tragedies and it was the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s work, published in 1623. Without it, a lot of Shakespeare’s plays would have been lost.

There were between 750 and 1000 copies hand-printed. The price for it in 1623 would have been £1 if bound and 15 shillings unbound. A school teacher at that time earned £20 a year. Only 230 First Folios have survived.

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Nature in Art Museum

According to their website, Nature in Art Museum is the world’s first museum and art gallery dedicated to fine, decorative and applied art inspired by nature. I had to visit this museum as I love nature in art. The museum is small, but filled with wonderful paintings, ceramics and sculptures. We weren’t allowed to take pictures inside the museum, but I took some pictures outside, in the beautiful gardens.

 Nature in Art Museum

Nature in Art Museum is housed in Wallsworth Hall, an 18th century Georgian mansion. The architecture of the building is beautiful. From the 1740s and until 1987 when it was bought by Nature in Art Trust the building has an interesting history, you can read about it here.

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Transformation

At Sudley House in Liverpool it’s a special exhibition called Transformation – One Man’s Cross-Dressing Wardrobe. Both the museum and the exhibition are free.

Transformation - One Man’s Cross-Dressing Wardrobe

Peter Farrer was born in Surrey in 1926 and lived in Liverpool for many years. His father was a schoolmaster and a clergyman. He started cross-dressing from the age of 14. He died this year aged 90. He had an interest in women’s period costumes and he collected garments, evening dresses from the 30s to 80s. He liked dresses made from taffeta. The exhibition displays 21 garments from Peter’s wardrobe.

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