Category Archives: Travel

The White Cross Pub

Yesterday my husband and I went to Lancaster and we stopped for coffee at The White Cross Pub. The pub is near the canal, more info on their website. It is in an 130 years old cotton mill.

The name of the pub comes from the original stone white cross, that was just 200 meters away. It was a place were people travelling would stop and give thanks. It’s possible they would stop for food and drinks in the area too.

Storey’s Mill was finished in 1880. The building where the pub is now, used to be a storage place for raw materials. In the mill oil cloth and linoleum was made. In 1987 the area was transformed from a former industrial boundary to a lovely place with pub and offices, a short walk from the city centre.
The pub is independent and, on their website, they mention that they use local produce as much as possible. We will go there for a meal soon, as I really loved the feel of the pub.

 The White Cross Pub

It was raining, so I didn’t get any pictures from outside. I looked on their Instagram account and I saw this one. The pub is really lovely.

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Lion Salt Works

Lion Salt Works is a museum, voted the UK’s Best Heritage Project, and it can be found in Cheshire.

We’ve visited it as part of Heritage Open Days (it was free) and, unfortunately, we booked a volunteer led tour. It was the most boring thing I’ve been to. In a room, she stopped and said “have a look around, as we’ll spend 5 minutes here”. Lion Salt Works is a fascinating museum though and I would recommend visiting it. Maybe other tours are more engaging, but for us was a waste of time in a busy day.

 Lion Salt Works

The Lion Salt Works is a restored historic open-pan salt making site. Three types of salt were produced there, from table salt to salt used for agricultural purposes.

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St. Mary’s Church Weaverham

I’ve visited St. Mary’s Church Weaverham on Heritage Open Days last week. It was a guided tour and I enjoyed it a lot, as the guide told us so many interesting facts about the church. In Weaverham people have worshipped in a church on the spot where is St. Mary’s Church for over 1,000 years.

St. Mary’s Church Weaverham

The site is mentioned in Domesday survey, 1086. Before that, it was a Saxon church that stood there until 1277. In its place a new church was built from the 13th to the 14th century. The new church was long and narrow. The Tower that we can see today, the one where we saw the bells (more about this later in the post), is from that church. In the 16th century, during the reign of Elizabeth I, the church was extended to, approximately, the size that is today. In 2000 an addition was made to the church to include facilities.

02 St. Mary’s Church Weaverham

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The Holly Bush

My husband and I went to The Holly Bush pub last month, but I didn’t get the chance to talk about it until today. The Holly Bush is in Northwich, Cheshire and it was built in the 17th century. More details on their website.

The Holly Bush

During the Victorian period the pub was extended. The last extension, where the restaurant is today, was built only 12 years ago. Beside the pub there is an inn in a converted barn. I noticed a board with room prices when we’ve paid for the lunch and I think they are affordable. If they look as nice as the pub, it is value for money.

The Holly Bush Northwich

They do have a vegetarian section in the menu and I like that so much every time I see it. I ordered Four Mushroom Stroganoff, mushrooms cooked in a creamy & smoked paprika sauce (priced at £8.50) and my husband had Spicy Bean Burger, Kidney bean, vegetables & salsa sauce in breadcrumbs, (priced at £7.25). Strangely, there wasn’t any mention of side dishes and they weren’t mentioned in the menu either. So, my husband ordered chips for both of us while I was taking pictures in the pub. Well, it was fortunate he ordered chips because the dish would have been basic without them. We had half of each dish, as we usually do.

03 The Holly Bush

His burger was very good, but without any salad and only a bit of shop-bought ketchup.

04 The Holly Bush

My mushrooms were delicious, I liked the sauce and the veggies were cooked perfectly. I didn’t notice the “four” mushrooms, but it wasn’t an issue. I enjoyed the food and the location, but, as we had to pay extra for side dish and the burger was more basic than expected, it wasn’t as good value for money as we had in other pubs. Even if it was nice overall, I wouldn’t go there again for lunch.

The Holly Bush Northwich

These pictures are taken in the older parts of the pub. It’s really lovely.

The Holly Bush Northwich

07 The Holly Bush

The Holly Bush Northwich

The Holly Bush Inn is in Little Leigh, Northwich, Cheshire, CW8 4QY. Their car park is very big, so there are plenty of places to park.

Great Budworth

Great Budworth is a small village in Cheshire. It can trace back its history to 11th century, as it was mentioned in the Domesday Book. The name Great Budworth comes from the Old Saxon words bode (‘dwelling’) and wurth (‘a place by water’), the water being Pickworth Mere and Budworth Mere. A school was built in 1500s for the children that lived in the community. In 1875, the George and Dragon pub was remodeled. Before 1934 the only source of drinking water was a running pump, after that a pipeline was installed. Until 1948, Great Budworth was part of the Arley Hall estate.

Great Budworth

Now Great Budworth has a population of 300. I took a lot of pictures from the village. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did. I find walking through small villages like this one a relaxing and beautiful pass time. After that, I enjoy seeing everything again when I chose the pictures for the blog post and I retouch them in Photoshop.

Great Budworth

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Anderton Boat Lift

Anderton Boat Lift is an amazing piece of Victorian engineering. It was built in 1875 and it still does the job it was created to do: lifting narrowboats and barges straight up the 50 feet from the River Weaver to the Trent & Mersey Canal. It’s an ingenious structure and unique too. More details about it can be found on canalrivertrust.

Anderton Boat Lift

Edwin Clark (1814 – 1894) is the Designer of the Anderton Boat Lift. In 1870s the Weaver Navigation Trustees were concerned of the delays caused by moving cargoes between River Weaver and Trent&Mersey Canal. There were three options to solve the issues, a flight of locks, an inclined plane or a hydraulic lift. The last option was the best one as it involved limited loss of water and it could be built on a small site.

By the 1870s, Clark had a strong reputation as a designer of hydraulic machinery. He was asked to design and oversee the construction of the lift. Even though the costs were higher than anticipated, the lift was a wonder. Clark went to built other boat lifts in Europe.

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Manchester Jewish Museum

Even though we are living relatively close, we haven’t been to the Manchester Jewish Museum until last weekend. I thought it will be a fast visit, but in fact we’ve spent there three hours as we’ve went on two guided tours.

 Manchester Jewish Museum

Manchester Jewish Museum, the only Jewish Museum outside London, is located in a former Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue. The synagogue was completed in 1874 and it’s the oldest synagogue in Manchester that still survives. Before being transformed into a museum, the building had some issues and needed a bit of renovations.

The synagogue is built in an Moorish style. The stained glass windows are so interesting and very different from the ones I saw in churches of Christian denominations.

 Manchester Jewish Museum

The first tour we went to was called Jewish Manchester in 1912: Sweat Shops, Charity and the Titanic. In the tour, the guide talked about the lifestyle of the Jewish people living in Manchester in 1900s. She also talked about Sephardi Jews (from Spain) and Ashkenazi Jews (East-Europeans).

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