Category Archives: England

The Holly Bush

My husband and I went to The Holly Bush pub last month, but I didn’t get the chance to talk about it until today. The Holly Bush is in Northwich, Cheshire and it was built in the 17th century. More details on their website.

The Holly Bush

During the Victorian period the pub was extended. The last extension, where the restaurant is today, was built only 12 years ago. Beside the pub there is an inn in a converted barn. I noticed a board with room prices when we’ve paid for the lunch and I think they are affordable. If they look as nice as the pub, it is value for money.

The Holly Bush Northwich

They do have a vegetarian section in the menu and I like that so much every time I see it. I ordered Four Mushroom Stroganoff, mushrooms cooked in a creamy & smoked paprika sauce (priced at £8.50) and my husband had Spicy Bean Burger, Kidney bean, vegetables & salsa sauce in breadcrumbs, (priced at £7.25). Strangely, there wasn’t any mention of side dishes and they weren’t mentioned in the menu either. So, my husband ordered chips for both of us while I was taking pictures in the pub. Well, it was fortunate he ordered chips because the dish would have been basic without them. We had half of each dish, as we usually do.

03 The Holly Bush

His burger was very good, but without any salad and only a bit of shop-bought ketchup.

04 The Holly Bush

My mushrooms were delicious, I liked the sauce and the veggies were cooked perfectly. I didn’t notice the “four” mushrooms, but it wasn’t an issue. I enjoyed the food and the location, but, as we had to pay extra for side dish and the burger was more basic than expected, it wasn’t as good value for money as we had in other pubs. Even if it was nice overall, I wouldn’t go there again for lunch.

The Holly Bush Northwich

These pictures are taken in the older parts of the pub. It’s really lovely.

The Holly Bush Northwich

07 The Holly Bush

The Holly Bush Northwich

The Holly Bush Inn is in Little Leigh, Northwich, Cheshire, CW8 4QY. Their car park is very big, so there are plenty of places to park.

Great Budworth

Great Budworth is a small village in Cheshire. It can trace back its history to 11th century, as it was mentioned in the Domesday Book. The name Great Budworth comes from the Old Saxon words bode (‘dwelling’) and wurth (‘a place by water’), the water being Pickworth Mere and Budworth Mere. A school was built in 1500s for the children that lived in the community. In 1875, the George and Dragon pub was remodeled. Before 1934 the only source of drinking water was a running pump, after that a pipeline was installed. Until 1948, Great Budworth was part of the Arley Hall estate.

Great Budworth

Now Great Budworth has a population of 300. I took a lot of pictures from the village. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did. I find walking through small villages like this one a relaxing and beautiful pass time. After that, I enjoy seeing everything again when I chose the pictures for the blog post and I retouch them in Photoshop.

Great Budworth

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Anderton Boat Lift

Anderton Boat Lift is an amazing piece of Victorian engineering. It was built in 1875 and it still does the job it was created to do: lifting narrowboats and barges straight up the 50 feet from the River Weaver to the Trent & Mersey Canal. It’s an ingenious structure and unique too. More details about it can be found on canalrivertrust.

Anderton Boat Lift

Edwin Clark (1814 – 1894) is the Designer of the Anderton Boat Lift. In 1870s the Weaver Navigation Trustees were concerned of the delays caused by moving cargoes between River Weaver and Trent&Mersey Canal. There were three options to solve the issues, a flight of locks, an inclined plane or a hydraulic lift. The last option was the best one as it involved limited loss of water and it could be built on a small site.

By the 1870s, Clark had a strong reputation as a designer of hydraulic machinery. He was asked to design and oversee the construction of the lift. Even though the costs were higher than anticipated, the lift was a wonder. Clark went to built other boat lifts in Europe.

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Manchester Jewish Museum

Even though we are living relatively close, we haven’t been to the Manchester Jewish Museum until last weekend. I thought it will be a fast visit, but in fact we’ve spent there three hours as we’ve went on two guided tours.

 Manchester Jewish Museum

Manchester Jewish Museum, the only Jewish Museum outside London, is located in a former Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue. The synagogue was completed in 1874 and it’s the oldest synagogue in Manchester that still survives. Before being transformed into a museum, the building had some issues and needed a bit of renovations.

The synagogue is built in an Moorish style. The stained glass windows are so interesting and very different from the ones I saw in churches of Christian denominations.

 Manchester Jewish Museum

The first tour we went to was called Jewish Manchester in 1912: Sweat Shops, Charity and the Titanic. In the tour, the guide talked about the lifestyle of the Jewish people living in Manchester in 1900s. She also talked about Sephardi Jews (from Spain) and Ashkenazi Jews (East-Europeans).

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Blists Hill Victorian Town

Blists Hill Victorian Town is a lovely tourist attraction in Telford. I planned to visit it this year and we went this Saturday for the day. This will be a very long post with pictures and lots of details. I loved visiting the museum. I had to make a few collages as I picked too many pictures for the post, even so, there are 30 pics.

Blists Hill Victorian Town

Blists Hill is a small industrial town set in 1900. At that time, the Ironbridge Gorge was still known as an
industrial area, but less important as before. On the site of the museum it was an industrial landscape, but not a town. In the 1960s, the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust created a small industrial town, as the ones that were found on the East Shropshire Coalfield. Some monuments are original to the site, like the Blast Furnaces and other were relocated brick by brick from the local area. Some buildings were built using traditional building materials. Blists Hill Victorian Town opened in 1973.

Blists Hill Victorian Town

One of the first buildings in Blists Hill is the bank. There you can change your modern money for Victorian coins (not real) to spend in the shops in the Town. The rest can be exchanged back before you leave. The lady explained the coins to us, but there were so many it was impossible to grasp their value. Luckily all the shops have dual prices, in shillings and the modern equivalent.

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The Bowes Museum

The Bowes Museum is in County Durham, close to Barnard Castle that I visited on the same day. The museum is in a lovely chateaux built specially to house the museum.

The Bowes Museum

The Bowes Museum was on my bucket list for this year. I saw it on a blog a few years ago (can’t remember where, I would have linked) and I wanted to visit it. Durham is over 2 hours drive from us, so I kept postponing until I checked the bucket list and I saw that I didn’t visit much of what I planned. On Saturday we went there, the weather was lovely and we had a wonderful time.

The Bowes Museum

The museum was purpose built in the 19th century by John and Joséphine Bowes. John, the son of the 10th Earl of Strathmore, was born in London. His mother was a commoner, Mary Millner, who worked on Teesdale estate. They lived as husband and wife, but without being married. The Earl married Mary 16 hours before dying, in an attempt to secure John’s succession. Even after two court cases John was not recognized as the legitimate heir to the Strathmore title.

Despite being educated at Eton and Cambridge, John was never accepted by his peers. He had a very successful business with coal mines. In his 30s, he spent time in France where he bought a theatre and met the Parisian actress Joséphine Coffin-Chevallier.

Joséphine was born in 1825 and she was an actress in the Théatre des Variétés, Paris. She was a talented amateur painter and she shared John’s love of the arts. They got married in 1852 and they soon thought of the idea of creating a museum in Teesdale to show art to the local people.

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Barnard Castle

This weekend we’ve been to Barnard Castle in Teesdale, County Durham. The castle is managed by English Heritage, more details on their EH website. The castle has its name after the 12th century founder, Bernard de Balliol, the nephew of Guy de Baliol, a Knight from Picardy.

Teesdale is a historic market town with lovely shops and the nearby Bowes Museum, about which I’m going to talk about in a few days.

 Barnard Castle in Teesdale, County Durham

The Baliol family were very powerful and in 1282 Devorguilla, wife of John Baliol, gave the charter and endowments for the foundation of Balliol College in Oxford. Their son John was King of Scotland, but in 1296 he was defeated in battle by Edward I. He forfeited his castle and estates.

Barnard Castle passed to the Earls of Warwick. The Beauchamp family developed it and then passed into the hands of Richard III, through his wife, Anne Neville. The castle was owned by the Royal family until 1603.

 Barnard Castle in Teesdale, County Durham

Mortham Tower was at least five storeys high and it was a lookout tower. It was built in the 14th century. During that time the Great Hall was renovated and reached its final version.

Beside the tower, on the right, was the Great Hall. Thomas Beauchamp built it around 1330. The Great Hall was used for formal occasions. The next building housed the Great Chamber on the first floor. The Great Chamber was more comfortable and prestigious. In late medieval period it was converted to a gallery suitable for indoor exercise. One of the windows has a stone boar carved on it, the motif of Richard III.
The castle continues with the Round Tower, four storeys high.

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