The Edmund Gardner

Hubby booked a tour of Edmund Gardner, the largest piece in Liverpool Museum. It was lovely, we both enjoyed it very much. He took a lot of photographs, so there is an overload of pictures from our visit.

We’ve met the curator in the Museum of Liverpool and then we went on the Canning dock to see the ship. Canning docks are the oldest graving docks on Merseyside. This dock was build in the 18th century and was a center for ship repairs. Canning docks were closed in 1965.

Edmund Gardner worked for almost 30 years and now it has a great historical value. National Historic Ships Committee recognized her importance by including the vessel in its National Core Collection of Historic Ships.

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The Merseyside Maritime Museum purchased her in 1982, after she finished her work in 1981, and she is now conserved in dry dock. Having been bought straight from service, Edmund Gardner is entirely in original condition and is one of the only two large pilot boat preserved worldwide (the other one is in Australia).

The ship is open to the public for a few months during the summer.

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The pot where they used to heat up the tar used to refurbish the old wooden ships.

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The tar was poured thru the gutter for the men repairing the ships.

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A fiberglass replica of the boats used to transport pilots onto the ships.

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The Edmund Gardner was built in 1953 in Dartmouth by Philip and Sons. The Mersey Docks and Harbour Board had her built as the second of a new generation of large diesel-electric powered cutters to replace the pre-war steam cutters. The Edmund Gardner and her two sister ships were all designed by naval architects Graham and Woolnough of Liverpool. Following tradition, all three were named after chairmen of the Board, the other two were the Sir Thomas Brocklebank (No 1) and Arnet Robinson (No 3).

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The master’s accommodation.

There were 2 masters, each with his own room, below the bridge deck. The masters were 1st class pilots (the classes were achieved in time from 3 to 1 and it was a reflection of the size of the ship they had the authority to bring in). Even if they were on top of the hierarchy, their rooms are not the largest on the ship.

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The bridge was so nice. There are many interesting things to see and the curators told a lot of stories about the crew, the controls and their need of communication. On the ship there were so many ways to communicate, in Morse code, with light, radio and many others.

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This was a state of the art radar at that time.

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Lounge area. The tables and chairs were bolted in the ground. The wind is very strong on the Mersey, so, sometimes, they had to put some guardrails on the table to stop things to fall down.

This area was dedicated to the masters and pilots. The apprentices and engineers had another lounge. In that time the hierarchy was very important for them.

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Some old pictures with The Edmund Gardner. I love the 1st one, with the Liver building in the back.

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The pilots were transported from the Edmund Gardner to the ships they needed to get in the docks. The pilot was accompanied by 2 apprentices.

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The windows have protecting shields for bad weather.

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The TV room, previously known as smoking room. Another recreational area for masters and pilots. They were talking about problems that appeared when they brought ships in the docks and this way, the lesser experienced pilots could learn form the more experienced ones.

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The pilot rooms. There were 32 pilots on board of the Edmund Gardner and only 11 cabins, but they were for a few hours on the ship, so they didn’t need a lot of space.

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Galley and pantry. The galley staff were the only people in contact with everybody on board, as the rest of the crew were separated into different rooms and accommodations and worked varying shifts, so they were an important source of news and gossip.

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The cook had 2 helpers and he was cooking on a coal cooker. That cooker was replaced by a gas cooker in the mid 1970s, which was later replaced by an electric oven. The pantry was staffed by the steward and mess boy. It contains an electric oven to keep meals warm, an electric water boiler and plenty of storage space for cutlery, cups and plates.

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The pilots went thru this door when they boarded the boat for transportation.

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The engine room. The Edmund Gardner is a diesel electric ship, with two 640bhp National diesel engines. Using both engines would give the ship a top speed of 14 knots (16 miles per hour). Generally on station only one engine would be required. An engineer would be on watch at all times in the engine room, with a greaser to assist him.

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One of the engines.

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The engineer’s accommodation. He had the largest room because the engineer practically lived on the ship.

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The decks.

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It was a lovely experience. We learned a lot and had a great time. I definitely recommend it.

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A panoramic view of Birkenhead. Click on it to see it larger.

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5 year anniversary

Saturday was a very important day for us, our 5 year anniversary from our 2nd wedding (the religious one). So we decided to go see the seals from Hilbre Islands, within the Dee Estuary. The starting point was West Kirby beach, as you can see, the last time we went there the tide was high and the islands were unreachable by foot.

Rain was the first thing we saw. Pretty nice to watch, less nicely if you want to go on the river bay. But, fortunately, it didn’t rained to much. We started the 2 miles walk to the islands. On Festus’s blog I put more pictures of him at the Islands.

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Hubby played with Festus, just to get him a little tired.

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While I was carrying Festus’s backpack.

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The first island, Little Eye.

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The sand was a little wet, but I managed to cross to the Islands fine with my running shoes. But if you want to cross the river bay and you have some Wellingtons, wear them.

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Festus was waiting to see if I find something interesting, to play with, in the cave.

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The 3rd island, the biggest, named Hilbre Island. From there we were able to see the seals.

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In the background is Wales.

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The Seals. I didn’t knew we needed binoculars to see the seals, so we only get a glimpse of them. They were lovely, very curious.

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The seagulls were on the less windy side of the islands. In the direction of Hoylake.

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The Wirral Windfarm. I’ve read in the newspaper there is a plan to double the size of the wind farm. I think this is a very good idea, considering how windy it was.

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Back on the 2nd island, Middle Eye.

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It was an amazing trip and we all loved it. A perfect way to spend our anniversary.

We were on the Islands for a few hours, so we didn’t had time to prepare a cake (and we had already a lot of muffins). So, we kept it simple: stuffed eggs, aubergine and mayonnaise salad, grilled halumi with apache potatoes (they look different, but they are very tasty), baked with olive oil and salt.

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Manchester

Yesterday we went to Manchester. After the meetings we went for a stroll in the city center.

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Manchester’s China town, full of Chinese restaurants, guarded by a gate. In Liverpool there is a similar one.

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Albert square, in front of the city council.

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Brazennose Street

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Lincoln Square

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This is John Rylands Library.

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In the center there was a big screen and people were watching the football match between Germany and Italy.

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This will become the football museum.

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West Kirby Beach

Yesterday we had a great day at West Kirby Beach and Marine lake. We saw Hilbre Islands, they look beautiful.

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You can click on the panorama to see it bigger.

The Hilbre Islands are situated at the mouth of the Dee Estuary and they are important as a stopping-off point for the twice-yearly migration of birds along the west coast of Britain.

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West Kirby, from the path between the Marine lake and River Dee.

The Marine lake is one of the largest man-made lakes in the UK. It was build in 1899 and reconstructed in 1985. It is home to Wirral Sailing Centre.

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It was a strange feeling to walk between a lake and a river on a small path. But I can’t wait to do it again.

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Obviously I got an ice cream, with forest fruit topping and flake.

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I loved it! It was a great day out with a lovely sun and a great landscape. I hope we’ll have many beautiful days, so we can go there again. There are 200 place of free parking, but if it’s crowded you can go in the pay & display parking lot.

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Tate

Hubby had a meeting near Albert Dock, so I took advantage to visit Tate. I took some pictures, but the quality is not very good because I wasn’t allowed to use the flash.

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Africa…

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Sawdy, 1971 by Edward Kienholz

The exhibit presents a violent scene of racism, viewed through a car window. In the photography the black man is castrated by the group of white men. By using this frame, Kienholz implicates us in the scene. Is like we are watching the events from one of the pickup trucks.

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A larger view of the picture. Very interesting piece.

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Knock Knock, 2005 by Eva Rothschild

A lovely construction that evokes native American arts.

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The triangle door. I really love this door, is so creative.

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You can see Mersey and the docks thru the door.

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Michelangelo’s ‘David’?, 1987 by Eduardo Paolozzi

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Torsion, 1928-36 by Naum Gabo

Gabo created a sense of defined space with no delimitation by using transparent materials. The piece was conceived in 1928 but was constructed in 1936.

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A small view of Birkenhead from Tate’s windows.

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Roughly 92% Angel but about 8% Devil, 1982 by Edward Ruscha

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Sleeping Girl, 1943 by Balthus

His son described his father’s paintings of adolescent girls as “untouchable archetypes of purity”. In this painting the woman appears to be asleep, but in the same time, aware of her sexuality.

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Self-Portrait as a Businessman, 2002 by Pawel Althamer

On the night before the exhibition in 2002 in Berlin, Althamer appeared in this businessman’s outfit in the city center. He undressed and then walked away naked, representing the corporate role that he played but was able to dissociate from.

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VB47.364.DR, 2001 by Vanessa Beecroft

The performance that lead to this piece took place at the Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice. The models wear woven masks designed by Philip Treacy. This masks transformed the models into living sculptures.

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Philip Treacy’s Hat Blocks

A hat block or hat mould is a wooden block carved into the shape of the hat. All this blocks are made by Renzo Re (La Forme). He transformed the 3D designs made by Philip Treacy using wood and cotton into wooden forms. Every hat produced by Philip undergoes this process.

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I love this exhibit. The hats are very interesting and next time we’ll have a meeting in Manchester we have to visit the Hat Museum.

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Woman in Feather Hat, 1991, hat by Philip Treacy

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Kites in New Brighton

This weekend New Brighton hosted an interesting event: Kites Over The Mersey. It was lovely to see the kites and other lovely things, like the Lighthouse and Fort Perch Rock.

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In a pool there were remote controlled boats. They look very nice, realistic.

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On the way to the fort.

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You can see the Lighthouse in the background.

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Today was a Vintage Fair, so we couldn’t see the Fort properly, but we will visit it again soon.

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A diary of my travels, events, my thougths, blogging, craft projects and my home.